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Deer Lake First Nation

The Deer Lake reserve is under the Winnipeg Treaty of 1875 -- Treaty No. 5, and Band members relocated to Sandy Lake with a reserve around Sandy Lake Narrows for the Deer Lake Band, whose numbers had increased greatly since 1910 (also with some members who had migrated from Manitoba) In 1985, Deer Lake split into two separate Bands, Deer Lake and Sandy Lake. Deer Lake achieved full Band status in 1985.

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The Deer Lake reserve is within the boundaries of the territory described by the Winnipeg Treaty of 1875 — Treaty No. 5. The James Bay Treaty No. 9 Commissioners’ report notes that a Band of Indians residing the vicinity of Deer Lake, within the territory included in Treaty No. 5, signed an adhesion to the Treaty on June 9, 1910 that provided for a reserve in the proportion of 32 acres per capita. The reserve was never designated, and Band members relocated to Sandy Lake.

The 1929-1930 Adhesion to Treaty No. 9 approved and confirmed the establishment of a reserve around Sandy Lake Narrows for the Deer Lake Band, whose numbers had increased greatly since 1910 by the addition of new members who had migrated from Manitoba. In 1985, Deer Lake split into two separate Bands, Deer Lake and Sandy Lake. Deer Lake achieved full Band status in 1985.

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