Trans-Canada Highway.com please wait to load
What
  • imageAccommodations
  • imageAir Travel
  • imageAirport Parking
  • imageAttractions
  • imageAutomotive
  • imageBed & Breakfasts
  • imageBoat Rentals or Charters
  • imageBuses or Shuttles
  • imageCafe
  • imageCampgrounds
  • imageCasinos
  • imageCinema
  • imageCraft Beer - Winery
  • imageCurrency Exchange
  • imageEmergency
  • imageEntertainment
  • imageFarmers Market
  • imageFestivals
  • imageFire Hall
  • imageFirst Nation
  • imageFlea market
  • imageFree
  • imageGolf Course
  • imageGovernment
  • imageHistorical
  • imageHospital
  • imageHostel
  • imageHotels
  • imageKids Amusement
  • imageLimousines
  • imageLong Term Rental
  • imageMarijuana /CBD
  • imageMarinas
  • imageMuseum / Gallery
  • imagePark
  • imagePolice
  • imagePublic Transit
  • imageRental Car
  • imageRestaurant
  • imageRV Rental
  • imageShopping
  • imageShopping District
  • imageShopping mall
  • imageSki Resort
  • imageSpa
  • imageSports & Recreation
  • imageSports Team
  • imageTaxi
  • imageTheatre
  • imageTour
  • imageTourist Services
  • imageTours & Tour Guides
  • imageTrain
  • imageTransit Hub
  • imageTransportation
  • imageTravel
  • imageTravel Info/Office
  • imageVacation Rental
  • imageWilderness Lodge
Where
image
image

Poundmaker First Nation

A member of Treaty No. Six for setting reserves for the Plains First Nations.

Be the first to review

PITIKWAHANAPIWIYIN (POUNDMAKER)

Pitikwahanapiwiyin emerged as a political leader during the tumultuous years surrounding the extension of the treaty system and the influx of settlers into present-day Saskatchewan. Pitikwahanapiwiyin was recognized as a skilled orator and leader of his people by both Native and Non-native communities.

Born in about 1842 near Battleford in central Saskatchewan, Pitikwahanapiwiyin was the son of Sikakwayan, a Stoney shaman, and his Métis wife. Pitikwahanapiwiyin grew up with his Plains Cree relatives under the influence of his maternal uncle Mistawasis (Big Child), a leading figure in the Eagle Hill (Alberta) area. In 1873 Isapo-Muxika (Crowfoot), Chief of the Blackfoot, following a Plains Indian custom, adopted Pitikwahanapiwiyin to replace one of his own sons who had been killed in battle.

In August 1876 Pitikwahanapiwiyin, as headman of one of the River People bands, was influential enough to speak at the Treaty No. Six negotiations held at Fort Carlton. Pitikwahanapiwiyin emerged as one of the spokespersons for a group critical of the treaty. Though Treaty No. Six was amended to include a ‘famine clause,’ Pitikwahanapiwiyin continued to express concerns and agreed to sign the treaty on 23 August only because the majority of his band favoured it.
ABOUT POUNDMAKER CREE NATION
A LITTLE BIT OF HISTORY

PITIKWAHANAPIWIYIN (POUNDMAKER)

Pitikwahanapiwiyin emerged as a political leader during the tumultuous years surrounding the extension of the treaty system and the influx of settlers into present-day Saskatchewan. Pitikwahanapiwiyin was recognized as a skilled orator and leader of his people by both Native and Non-native communities.

Born in about 1842 near Battleford in central Saskatchewan, Pitikwahanapiwiyin was the son of Sikakwayan, a Stoney shaman, and his Métis wife. Pitikwahanapiwiyin grew up with his Plains Cree relatives under the influence of his maternal uncle Mistawasis (Big Child), a leading figure in the Eagle Hill (Alberta) area. In 1873 Isapo-Muxika (Crowfoot), Chief of the Blackfoot, following a Plains Indian custom, adopted Pitikwahanapiwiyin to replace one of his own sons who had been killed in battle.

In August 1876 Pitikwahanapiwiyin, as headman of one of the River People bands, was influential enough to speak at the Treaty No. Six negotiations held at Fort Carlton. Pitikwahanapiwiyin emerged as one of the spokespersons for a group critical of the treaty. Though Treaty No. Six was amended to include a ‘famine clause,’ Pitikwahanapiwiyin continued to express concerns and agreed to sign the treaty on 23 August only because the majority of his band favoured it.

In the autumn of 1879, Pitikwahanapiwiyin, now chief, accepted a reserve and settled with 182 followers on 30 square miles along the Battle River about 40 miles west of Battleford. Frustrated by the government’s failure to fulfill treaty promises, Pitikwahanapiwiyin became active in Indian politics: representing the Cree at inter-band meetings and acting as a spokesperson with the government.
ive days later the Battleford bands learned of the Métis’ defeat at Batoche. Regaining control of the combined bands, Pitikwahanapiwiyin sent Father Louis Cochin to Major-General Frederick Middleton asking for his peace terms. On 26 May, Pitikwahanapiwiyin surrendered his arms and his followers at Fort Battleford. He was immediately imprisoned.

On 17 August 1885 Pitikwahanapiwiyin’s trial on the charge of treason-felony began in Regina before Judge Richardson. Regarded as second in importance only to Riel’s, the trial lasted for two days. After deliberating for half an hour, the jury returned a guilty verdict. Pitikwahanapiwiyin was sentenced to three years in the Stony Mountain Penitentiary in Manitoba.

image